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example:ecog_ny [2018/08/04 19:54]
arjen [Data analysis]
example:ecog_ny [2018/10/21 14:58] (current)
42.49.180.224 [Introduction]
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 ==== Introduction ==== ==== Introduction ====
-In this example script, we will demonstrate how to analyze functional brain activity in ECoG data. The tutorial contains instructions and code for event-related potentials (ERP), high-gamma power (HGP, 80 - 200 Hz) and time-frequency analyses, including statistical analyses and visualization of the outcome. HGP is a measure of neural activity that is specific for ECoG data analysis. Because high frequency signals are strongly attenuated by tissue and bone that lie between source and sensor, high-gamma activity can hardly be found in scalp EEG data. However, in ECoG data HGP (80 - 200 Hz) is a very prominent neural signature. HGP does not seem to be of oscillatory nature but has rather been associated with population neural spiking rate (Manning et al., 2009; Ray & Maunsell, 2011). It is also highly locally specific, compared with low frequency activity and ERPs. +In this example script, we will demonstrate how to analyze functional brain activity in ECoG data. The tutorial contains instructions and code for event-related potentials (ERP), high-gamma power (HGP, 80 - 200 Hz) and time-frequency analyses, including statistical analyses and visualization of the outcome. HGP is a measure of neural activity that is specific for ECoG data analysis. Because high frequency signals are strongly attenuated by tissue and bone that lie between source and sensor, high-gamma activity can hardly be found in scalp EEG data. However, in ECoG data HGP (80 - 200 Hz) is a very prominent neural signature. HGP does not seem to be of oscillatory nature but has rather been associated with population neural spiking rate (Manning et al., 2009; Ray & Maunsell, 2011). It is also highly locally specific, compared with low frequency activity and ERPs.
 ==== Background ==== ==== Background ====
 This dataset was recorded at the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center of the New York University School of Medicine and processed by members of the Clinical Neurophysiology Lab (Thomas Thesen) and the Multisensory Integration Research Group (Martin Krebber, Daniel Senkowski, Charité - University Medicine Berlin). (Support by the CRCNS Data Sharing Grant 01GQ1416 is gratefully acknowledged.) This dataset includes neural recordings from an electrode grid, with an experimental manipulation that illustrates the spatiotemporal precision of these type of recordings. We will repeat code to select the trials and preprocess the data as described in the [[tutorial:​timefrequencyanalysis|time-frequency analysis tutorial]]. We assume that the reader is already familiar with preprocessing and time-frequency analysis. This dataset was recorded at the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center of the New York University School of Medicine and processed by members of the Clinical Neurophysiology Lab (Thomas Thesen) and the Multisensory Integration Research Group (Martin Krebber, Daniel Senkowski, Charité - University Medicine Berlin). (Support by the CRCNS Data Sharing Grant 01GQ1416 is gratefully acknowledged.) This dataset includes neural recordings from an electrode grid, with an experimental manipulation that illustrates the spatiotemporal precision of these type of recordings. We will repeat code to select the trials and preprocess the data as described in the [[tutorial:​timefrequencyanalysis|time-frequency analysis tutorial]]. We assume that the reader is already familiar with preprocessing and time-frequency analysis.